Welcome to the National Action Agenda
to Advance Upstream Social Determinants and Health Equity


Stewards of Change Institute
, the Stanford University Center for Population Health Sciences and additional organizational collaborators across the country created a National Action Agenda to Advance Upstream Social Determinants and Health Equity. The initiative’s intent was to instigate and implement tangible, systems-level change across Health, Human Services, Education, Public Health, Public Safety and other domains.

The Equity Action Agenda encompassed a coordinated set of ambitious activities throughout this year and beyond, all of which were designed to significantly accelerate progress through cross-sector data-sharing, interoperability and collaboration. We strongly believed that doing so would:

  • Enable a more-effective response to health crises such as Covid-19; 
  • Broadly, systemically advance holistic, person-centered care; and
  • Significantly contribute to furthering health equity and social justice.

* Important: Six workgroup teams helped shape the National Action Agenda, each focused on a different Social Determinant: Community & Social ContextEconomic MobilityEducationHealth Care & Behavioral Health SystemLegal, and Neighborhood & Physical Environment

National Action Agenda Symposium to Advance Upstream Social Determinants and Health Equity

The National Action Agenda Symposium was held on January 25-26, 2021. Its focus included the six action recommendations devised by subject matter experts nationwide during the past year, along with a preview of how work will begin at our first implementation site in the months ahead.

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Action Recommendations
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In Collaboration with our Partners 

 

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About the SDOH National Action Agenda

Why NOW?

We have initiated the action steps in this unique effort because:

  • A national agenda focused on the Social Determinants of Health and Well-Being (particularly on “upstream” activities in communities nationwide) is long overdue. It should be a critical component of post-coronavirus rebuilding activities.
  • Covid-19 has had a broad and deep impact throughout society, contributing to troubling public health, economic and social problems. Pointedly, the people most negatively impacted are those who already were underserved and under-resourced.
  • The need to work more explicitly for equity, in health and more broadly, is clear. Interoperability is a critical way to pursue that goal by routinely providing the data needed both to understand the impact of racial/socioeconomic disparities and to address them.
  • This is a historic opportunity to make fundamental, generational changes that will help to drive progress in many concrete ways.

Learn more about the action agenda >>

Action Agenda Timeline

  • Webinar Launch of National Action Agenda (August 14, 2020)
  • Form 6 Social Determinants of Health Workgroups (Late August 2020)
  • Workgroup Leaders/Co-Leaders Kick-Off Meeting (September 25, 2020)
  • Monthly Workgroup Sessions (September 2020 – January 2021)
  • Monthly Cross-Group Synthesis Meetings (September 2020 – January 2021)
  • Produce Drafts of “The Social Determinants: A Call to Action for Making Tangible Progress” for ongoing comment and refinement; to be used to help shape agenda for the national symposium (Q2, Q3, Q4 2020)
  • Stewards of Change Institute Virtual Convening (January 25-26, 2021)
  • Finalize “The Social Determinants: A Call to Action for Making Tangible Progress,” as a product of the Symposium and workgroups (April 2021)
  • Begin implementation (April 2021)

 

  Featured Resources

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 Featured Webinars

View all Past Webinars >>

 

Leadership Team & Advisors

 

Core AA members

  • Karen Smith, M.D., M.P.H., (former) Director of California Department of Public Health
  • Pierre-Gerlier Forest, PhD, Professor and Director, James S. and Barbara A. Palmer Chair in Public Policy, School of Public Policy, University of Calgary
  • David H. Rehkopf, ScD, MPH, Associate Professor of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology); Co-director of the Stanford University Center for Population Health Sciences
  • Lesley Sept, Executive Director of Population Health Sciences, VPHS-Population Health Sciences
  • Daniel Stein, MBA, President, Stewards of Change Institute

Synthesis Advisors

  • David Aylward, JD, Assistant Clinical Professor of Family Medicine, University of Colorado School of Medicine
  • Alina Baciu, PhD, MPD, Senior Program Officer, National Academy of Sciences
  • Dan Chavez, Executive Director, San Diego Health Connect
  • Toby Ewing, Executive Director, CA Mental Health Services Oversight and Accountability Commission (MHSOAC)
  • Caroline Fichtenberg, Managing Director, Social Interventions Research and Evaluation Network (SIREN), UCSF Center for Health and Community
  • Stacy Shwartz Olagundoye, MS, Program Manager, California Alliance of Child and Family Services, The Catalyst Center
  • Michael Wilkening, Special Advisor or Innovation & Digital Services, Office of Governor Gavin Newsom (CA)

 

  • Evelyn Gallego, MBA, MPH, CPHIMS, Found & CEO at EMI Advisors, LLC, SIREN/HL7 Gravity Project Program Manager at Health Level Seven International (HL7)
  • Ryan Howells, Principal, Leavitt Partners
  • Nick Macchione, Agency Director and Deputy Chief Administrative Officer, San Diego Department of Health and Human Services
  • Kshemendra Paul, Chief Data Officer at U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, Mission and Strategy Cloud Action Officer & Deputy Director at Department of Homeland Security
  • David Ross, ScD, President & CEO, The Task Force for Global Health Inc., (former) Director of the Public Health Informatics Institute
  • Ken Kaplan, MSW, MARCH/HP, Founding Partner, Health Community Ventures, Inc.
  • Uma Ahluwalia, Managing Principal, Health Management Associates

 

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Comments

  • As the basis for a BHAG to improve our nation's 'population health' and its 'healthcare', I offer a recent analysis of our nation's Social capital, county by county! Kyne & Aldrich. 2019. Capturing Bonding, Bridging, and Linking Social Capital through Publicly Available Data. https://doi:10.1002/rhc3.12183

    Among many definitions of SOCIAL CAPITAL, I offer one that might offer a better strategy for improving 'population health'.

    . SOCIAL CAPITAL may be defined as:
    . the bystander spontaneity to use the norms of trust, cooperation, and reciprocity
    . for resolving the social dilemmas occurring within a community
    . that becomes more uniformly expressed by the community's resident persons
    . when multi-generational caring relationships
    . increasingly permeate the community's social networks.


    CARING RELATIONSHIPS are defined as

    . a social interaction involving two persons
    . that begins with beneficence and deference for each other's autonomy,
    . thrives by each person's steady renewal of their adaptive skills, and
    . flourishes when the two persons communicate 'in harmony'
    . with warmth, non-critical acceptance, congruence, and empathy.
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